Coin a phrase meaning

coin a phrase meaning

1Said ironically when introducing a banal remark or cliché. 'I had to find out the hard way—to coin a phrase'. More example sentences. To coin a phrase definition: You say ' to coin a phrase ' to show that you realize you are making a pun or using a | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and. To coin a phrase means to invent a new saying or idiomatic expression that is new or unique. However, the term to coin a phrase is most often used today in a. coin a phrase meaning

Coin a phrase meaning -

In the 16th century the 'coining' of words and phrases was often referred to. That is not so. This derives from the French cliquer, from the clicking sound of the stamp used to make metal typefaces. Lucton's Freedom, "It takes all sorts to make a world, to coin a phrase. This usage derived from an earlier 14th century meaning of coin, which meant wedge. To create a new phrase. The wedge-shaped dies which were used to stamp the blanks were called coins and the metal blanks and the subsequent 'coined' money took their name from them. The wedge-shaped dies which were used to stamp the blanks were called coins and the metal blanks and the subsequent 'coined' money took their name from them. This has provoked some to suggest that 'coin a coin a phrase meaning derives from the process of quoining wedging phrases in a coin a phrase meaning press. It appears to be American in origin - it certainly appears in publications there long before any can be found from any other parts of the world. Printers also use the term as the name for bicentennial dollar coin expandable wedges that are used to hold lines of type in place in a press. In the 16th century the 'coining' of words and phrases was often referred to. Coining later began to be associated with inventiveness in language.

Coin a phrase meaning -

Lucton's Freedom, "It takes all sorts to make a world, to coin a phrase. What's the origin of the phrase 'Coin a phrase'? By that time the monetary coinage was often debased or counterfeit and the coining of words was often associated with spurious linguistic inventions; for example, in George Puttenham's The arte of English poesie, "Young schollers not halfe well studied Coining later began to be associated with inventiveness in language. Coins - also variously spelled coynes, coigns, coignes or quoins - were the blank, usually circular, disks from which money was minted.

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